Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Iraq PSD and Evasive Driving Training


We are launching our evasive driving series with this collection of Iraq PSD Low-profile motorcade and evasive driving training footage.  The Iraq stuff was shot in 2004-2005 in and around Baghdad in what was then known as the Triangle of Death.  That name wasn't ironic either, like when you call a really big guy Tiny or a dog with three legs Lucky.  That place totally blew.

Two out of our first three motorcades, run in early 04 in SUV type vehicles, were ambushed.  We switched to the low-profile but high-powered BMWs, and Mercedes, and used station wagons as gun trucks.  We relied on stealth and camouflage to move around whenever possible, and speed when stealth wasn't working out too good.  It had it's disadvantages, like anything else, but after we got the hang of how to do it correctly, I would not have ridden any other way.

Camouflage is key.  If you're going to look like the natives, you have to act like the natives.  Aggressive blocking or other overt security moves are going to draw attention, so you have to be relaxed and accept the normal traffic flow around you more than you would if you were running a hardened, overt motorcade.

The training showcases a group of Force Recon Marines training to deploy to Iraq for a PSD mission.  They are learning some of the techniques and tactics that may be needed to drive in that type of environment.  Barricade breaching, the PIT, emergency turns, tactical backing, etc. are all valuable skills to possess.  Seek qualified instruction before attempting any of the emergency maneuvers shown in the video.







14 comments:

  1. Looking/acting like the natives is key...while we only ran Route Irish in armored convoys, my buddy (who writes on Prepography under the name Infidel) drove Irish nearly every day in a beat up old Toyota wearing a headscarf and his six month growth of beard and never had any issues. His only protection (other than personal weapons) were a ballistic blanket and a remarkable ability not to look like a target.

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    Replies
    1. Andrew,

      You've got the concept of the low-profile motorcade down perfectly. I never did any work in armored convoys while I was in Iraq. The low-profile method took a little getting used to, but once we perfected it, I wouldn't have wanted to ride any other way. Thanks for your comments and interest in what we are doing.

      Charlie

      Delete
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    1. Mark,

      You're most welcome. I'm glad you are enjoying the blog. I'll be sure to check out the website.

      Charlie

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